election

Woman Accused of Election Fraud Faces Additional Charges From Cherokee Nation AG.

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The Attorney General of the Cherokee Nation has filed new charges against an Oklahoma election campaign volunteer already accused of election fraud in a race for Cherokee Council.

Lisa Cookson is now facing an additional five charges of “false personation” after the Cherokee Nation AG’s filing against her in tribal court. Cookson volunteered for the campaign of Bobby Slover, a candidate for District 2 Tribal Council in the June 5, 2021, general election of the Cherokee Nation.

A Cherokee Nation news release stated that Cookson’s election fraud occurred between January and April 2021. Cookson “allegedly prepared, altered and signed more than 90 absentee ballot request forms given to the Cherokee Nation Election Commission without the knowledge or consent of voters.”

There were 14 witnesses to the alleged crimes committed by Cookson, including Bobby Slover, Venita Jo Slover, and David Walkingstick, a former Tribal Council member. Cookson was arrested on May 4, 2021.

“The Cherokee Nation Attorney General’s Office takes election fraud allegations very seriously,” Attorney General Sara Hill stated of Cookson’s case. “It remains vitally important that tribal election laws are enforced in order to protect the rights of Cherokee Nation citizens and to uphold the integrity of our electoral process.”

Cookson is scheduled to be back in court on August 10. “Each count of election fraud and false personation is punishable by up to three years in prison and a maximum fine of $15,000,” according to Oklahoma’s News 4.

Election fraud cases are gaining more attention across the country as investigations into the 2020 presidential election, such as the Arizona audit, continue.

On Monday, hand counters carrying out the Arizona election audit finished the tally of all regular ballots which were cast for the presidential and U.S. Senate election in November 2020.

The audit is now entering a second stage where workers are photographing every ballot “to ensure that no phony ballots have been slipped in.”  Nine other states, including Georgia and Pennsylvania, have sent delegations to the Arizona audit facility to see how the audit functions and perhaps prepare for election audits of their own.


Catherine Salgado

Catherine Salgado is a double-major in Classical Languages and Theology and a former contributor to The National Pulse.