Who Should Trump Choose for VP? Our Writers Weigh In . . .

July 14, 2016

by The Pulse 2016


Donald Trump (photo credit: Gage Skidmore)

Donald Trump (photo credit: Gage Skidmore)

Of the candidates on Donald Trump’s reported VP shortlist, who would be his most advisable choice?

Ralph Benko

Mike Pence is just being Hoosier-in-Chief.
The official state drink of Indiana is… water.

Only in Indiana. Milk too controversial apparently.
That’s just how polite those Hoosiers are.

Not squishy.
Polite!

Sweet Home Alabama! Their official state drink:
Conecuh Ridge Alabama Fine Whiskey!

Hello, Sen.
Sessions?

Deal W. Hudson

Trump’s VP pick should accomplish three things: first, assuage concerns about Trump’s lack of political experience; second, add a “steady hand” at the tiller in directing our nation through turbulent times; and, third, nail down the electoral votes of a key swing state. Newt Gingrich and Mike Pence satisfy the first two, though the former more so; but neither brings crucial electoral votes. General Michael Flynn adds nothing to the ticket except confusion. Gov. Chris Christie couldn’t carry his own state and makes the ticket New York/New Jersey. It doesn’t work on many levels. Thus, there is no likely choice who meets all three criteria. I hope there are some possible choices not on the short list.

Joshua Pinho

Of the three candidates for Trump’s VP, Newt Gingrich is the clear choice. Gingrich was one of Trump’s first key surrogates, at a time when few were willing to openly shill for Trump. Gingrich has spoken positively about Trump’s rise to political prominence and has encouraged his fellow Republicans to unite behind Trump. As VP, he could transition from surrogate/supporter to “attack dog,” a common role for a VP nominee. The media is undoubtedly against Trump, and Newt showed his ability to nimbly deflect and attack the media during the 2012 campaign cycle.

However, the key benefit to a Gingrich vice presidency would be his experience as a twenty-year veteran of the House of Representatives, former Speaker, and former Whip. Trump’s status as a political outsider has, undoubtedly, appealed to voters. However, the flip side to that coin is that Trump’s lack of political experience will seriously hinder his ability to move his agenda, especially his grand plan for a border wall, through Congress.

Terry Schilling

There are four VP choices that I think are most likely — Gov. Mike Pence, Gov. Chris Christie, Sen. Jeff Sessions, and former Speaker Newt Gingrich. Out of these four options, I think that Newt Gingrich best fits with Trump. Firstly, who better to partner with Trump than the architect of the ’94 Republican Revolution? Gingrich has a knack for knowing what resonates with voters and how to frame arguments in the most politically effective way. Gingrich is a solid conservative, and better yet, is known as a fighter. While he was able to make grand bargains, it’s more than arguable that Republicans got the better of these deals during the Clinton Administration. He won’t divide the party, but would rather unite it — and is the one with the least amount to lose by tying himself to the Trump ticket if Trump loses in November — making him most likely to accept an offer.

Jon Schweppe

Of those on Trump’s short list, I would go with Newt Gingrich. Newt has loads of experience and solid conservative credentials. He is well respected in Washington and in the heartland. And while he may not benefit Trump electorally in the way VP picks traditionally do, he would ensure that a Trump administration would be ready for prime time on day one. General Flynn would be a great Defense Secretary. As for Mike Pence, well, after his miserable failure in Indiana last year with the RFRA bill, I would recommend Trump stay as far away from Pushover Pence as possible.


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