The National Pulse

How Conservatives Are Fighting Back on College Campuses — And Winning

Dr. Tommy Curry is a professor of philosophy at Texas A&M University. In 2012, he listed out situations where it is acceptable to kill white people, and still pushes such propaganda in his classroom today.

Eric Clanton used to be a professor at Diablo Valley College. He was let go when he assaulted pro-Trumpers with a bike lock during a clash between pro-Trump and anti-Trump protesters.

Dr. Melina Abdullah is the Chair of Pan-African Studies at California State University-Los Angeles. She called for counter-action against a group of students who hosted conservative speaker Ben Shapiro on campus, and has called for the police to be abolished.

What do these three people have in common?

They are all representatives of the hostile takeover of college campuses by the Left. They are evidence of the radical, liberal agenda that is being pushed in institutions of higher learning all over the country.

There once was an era where difference in thought and ideology were fuel for healthy debate and personal growth. There was respect to be found, and facts and reason held weight. Now, if you are a student who thinks differently than your professor or administration, you are essentially painting a target on your back.

Conservatism has, in a sense, had to go underground on many college campuses across the country. Students are fearful to face the wrath of their peers due to differing political ideology, and are nervous that letting their professor know that they support freedom, liberty, and limited government could lead to the decimation of their grades.

The fate of conservatism in academia looks grim. It can leave us shaking our heads, asking, “Can conservatives push back on college campuses and actually win?”

Thankfully, there is hope to be found, because the answer to that question is a resounding ‘yes’.

Though the millennial generation has left academia as a mess of safe spaces, hurt feelings, and intolerance, there is a generation of students being raised that are lovers of liberty and, therefore, willing to fight for it. The tide is turning on colleges all across the country.

It can be evidenced by the astonishing growth of organizations such as Turning Point USA that fight for limited government, free markets, and free people. You see it in students who are willing to be brave and potentially sacrifice their reputation in order to host conservative speakers or speak out and table on their campuses for conservative causes. It’s evidenced in the students who are tired of being told that the First Amendment only applies to them in a tiny amount of square footage on campus, and who sue their schools for free speech violations.

One of the most important developments for the potential progress of conservatism on college campuses has been the newfound willingness to hold professors accountable for what they say and do. Gone are the days when professors held such an intimidating position that their actions went fairly unquestioned. Now, with the development of social media, organizations like The Professor Watchlist, and the ability to film or document anything with the simple tap of a smartphone button, professors are suddenly realizing that they can no longer simply bully any student who disagrees with them or spew leftist propaganda and never have to face the consequences.

Yes, college campuses have been difficult places for conservatives for several decades now, and that isn’t going to change in the blink of an eye. However, a fire has been lit and is now being fanned into flame on behalf of freedom and diversity of opinion, and before we know it, campuses across the country will be completely ablaze. The past and present of conservatism on campus may be grim, but the future is ever so bright.

Kelvey Vander Hart

Kelvey Vander Hart is passionate about Jesus, conservatism, fitness, and fantastic coffee; she is also the Associate Editor at Caffeinated Thoughts. She can be followed on Twitter @kovanderhart.

  • The last time I took college classes was in 1992 so it’s been a while since I was a student, but I have never experienced the kinds of attitudes you’re describing. As a school teacher I was very aware of what subjects were, as a teacher, allowable in the classroom, and subjects like religion that were not. I also knew not to push my personal views and opinions on students.