Moore, Strange Set for GOP Showdown in Alabama — But Who Will Win?

Alabama is in the midst of one of the most intense Senate elections in recent years, after three strong Republican candidates closely split the early primary vote. In the first round of voting, former state Supreme Court Judge Roy Moore came out on top with 38.9 percent, followed by current U.S. Senator Luther Strange at 32.8 percent, and U.S. Rep. Mo Brooks at 19.7 percent. Seeing as no candidate reached 50 percent of the total vote, Moore and Strange will compete in a runoff election set for September 26. Both candidates appeal to the voters of Alabama in different ways.

PredictIt Plays of the Week: Cruz 2020 and the Alabama Senate Race

It’s been a couple weeks since I last wrote a PredictIt column, but I assure you I haven’t gone anywhere. If you’re wondering about my last LOCK, check out my column from two weeks ago: the Kelly/Priebus contract still has not been adjudicated by PredictIt, and the contract is still open for trading. I stand by my prediction that PredictIt will rule in favor of the Kelly contract holders, although it remains to be seen when exactly that will happen. This week I have two new LOCKS for you. LOCK: Ted Cruz Won’t Run for President in 2020 Market: Will Ted

All Republican Eyes on Alabama for Heated GOP Senate Race

The coming Senate primary contest in Alabama between incumbent Sen. Luther Strange, Rep. Mo Brooks, and former Judge Roy Moore next Tuesday has caught the attention of the President and his fellow Republicans in Congress. After Jeff Sessions was tapped by President Trump to become the nation’s next Attorney General, Senator Luther Strange was appointed to the seat by Alabama Governor Robert Bentley. Soon after, however, Gov. Bentley resigned over allegations that he used state resources to cover up an affair. His replacement, Lieutenant Governor Kay Ivey, called for a special election to take place on December 12th. Quickly approaching is

Should a Teen Need a License to Mow Lawns?

This article is part of series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation. In a Liberty Minute entitled “May I See Your License,” Helen Krieble takes on government policies that make it more difficult for Americans to work: Do you need a license to reupholster a chair? In seven states, you can pay a hefty fine if you don’t have one. Fifty years ago, less than five percent of American workers were required to have a state license to perform their jobs legally. Today, nearly 30 percent of workers need a license. We can

Alabama Wants Local Control over Education. Will President Trump Deliver?

During the 2015 fight over the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), over 200 parent and conservative organizations and leaders denounced the bill due to its extension of tight control over state and local education by the federal government — features it retained from its No Child Left Behind predecessor. One of the strongest concerns was the law giving the education secretary veto power over state plans. Although the authors and proponents of ESSA have constantly spewed forth propaganda that the Common Core Standards are gone at the federal level and that state and local control have returned for the first time

Corruption, Common Core Highlight Wild Race to Replace Jeff Sessions

The new Republican governor of Alabama, Kay Ivey, just set the date for the special election to fill Jeff Sessions’ old Senate seat: August 15. Let the games begin. It’s pure Southern gothic. First, there is the man currently holding that seat, appointed by disgraced former Gov. Robert Bentley as one of his final acts before leaving office. If Superman’s archenemy and Batman’s archenemy met and produced a love child, they might have called him “Luther Strange.” Strange was elected as attorney general pledging to clean up Alabama’s government corruption. However, last November, Strange went to the GOP-controlled House Judiciary Committee and