CORTES: These Republicans Are Rushing to Enable Soros-Backed Open Borders Policies – And They’ll Pay a Political Price.

“We owe them.” Former Vice-President Joe Biden proffered that assessment about illegal migrants at the presidential debate in Nashville on October 22nd. In reality, our country owes precisely nothing to people who trespassed their way into America, especially considering all of them jeopardize the economic security, and some of them imperil the physical safety of American citizens. The only debt owed by elected leaders is to the citizens of this great republic: the people who consent to being governed. Amazingly – and perhaps predictably – a group of Republicans have already emerged, ready to assist the left’s agenda to effectively

This Week in Economics: 3 Stories You Should Know About

Here is a rundown on some of the biggest economic developments this week. 1.) Former Fed Chair Paul Volcker passes away. Paul Volcker, who’s chairmanship of the Federal Reserve played a pivotal role in Reagan’s supply-side prosperity boom, passed away at 92 this week. Tributes have poured in for Volcker — a literal and figurative economic giant — who will be remembered for his role in slaying the Carter-era inflation as well as the distinguished career in public service that followed. On Fox Business, economist Arthur Laffer remembered Volcker for his role in the supply-side revolution and, intriguingly, his opposition

“Capitalist Manifesto” Makes Strong Case Against Socialism, Cronyism Ahead of 2020

This week, a timely new e-book was released making the case for why capitalism is the best system for spreading universal opulence. “The Capitalist Manifesto,” authored by supply-sider Ralph Benko and prominent Tea Party organizer Bill Collier, serves as an easily readable primer on what capitalism is while heading into an election cycle that may challenge this system head on.   The e-book, in equal parts, serves as an indictment of the socialist philosophy — which the authors label “neo-feudalism” — and an indictment of the corrosion of capitalism, which the authors blame for capitalism’s waning public support. The e-book

Bloomberg’s Entry Into 2020 Race Shows Democrats Are Panicking

Reports indicate that former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is preparing the paperwork to qualify for the Democratic presidential primary in at least one state. This news comes on the heels of increasing speculation that both Eric Holder and Hillary Clinton could join the race as late entries. Why are a growing number of Democratic politicians mulling a presidential run? Readers likely know the answer. Many Democrats don’t believe that their current front runner — Sen. Elizabeth Warren — can defeat Donald Trump. Sen. Warren made the political calculation to hitch her wagon to the socialist policies of Bernie

Federal Reserve Under Scrutiny Ahead of Key Meeting

This week, the Federal Reserve will be in the spotlight as markets digest where the central bank stands on this rate-cutting cycle. A CNBC survey of economists and money managers showed 80 percent of respondents anticipate another interest rate cut in October, and a narrow majority believes it will be the last rate cut of 2019. The Fed funds market — a key gauge of the direction of Fed policy — shows a 93 percent chance of a 25-basis-point rate cut. Adding greater uncertainty to the mix is whether the Fed will provide greater transparency on its interventions in the

Will a Weak Global Economy Drag Down the U.S. With It?

Pundits and politicians are vociferously debating the health of the U.S. economy, but one subject that isn’t up for debate is the health of the world economy — it stinks. Economic growth has slowed precipitously in China, India, Germany, France, U.K., Italy, Japan, India and much of the developed world. For now, the U.S. is still the world’s economic lifeboat — but with increasing signs that we won’t be immune to the global economic slowdown. Consider the following: In September, U.S. manufacturing activity plummeted to a 10-year low. In September, growth in the service sector of the U.S. economy slowed

Why Andrew Yang’s “Freedom Dividend” Would Be a Disaster

I’m going to do what the media won’t — talk about Andrew Yang. Despite being “the hottest candidate this side of Elizabeth Warren” right now, Yang was allotted less than 8 minutes of speaking time during last night’s 3-hour Democratic debate, the least of any candidate in the field. This marginalization of Yang follows a week where NBC and CNN omitted him from graphics of the top tier Democratic candidates, which led to “YangMediaBlackout” trending on Twitter. My take on all of this is that the establishment’s attempt to exclude Yang is both deliberate and unfortunate — because it is

This Week in Economics: 3 Stories You Should Know About

Welcome back from Labor Day weekend! I hope it was a great one for all our readers. I was out in Texas for the first time, and as a good conservative, it pains me to be back in the swamp! But, lucky for us, this shortened work week did provide us with some exciting economic news to come home to. Here are three of the biggest stories from this week: 1.) Trump is asking you if you support his plan to index capital gains for inflation. This week Steve Forbes retweeted a column by Senator Ted Cruz (R-Texas) and Americans

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