Santorum Pushes for New GOP Economic Message

While speaking at a Missouri Republican Party event on February 21, former Senator Rick Santorum advocated for moving away from the GOP’s “tired message” on economics and instead adopted a more “caring” one. He stated, in particular, that Republicans should avoid exclusively touting efforts to “cut taxes for the rich to create growth” and instead support measures that connect with a struggling middle class, such as raising the minimum wage to $8.75 gradually over three years. “People don’t think we care,” Santorum said of the GOP. “Sometimes when someone is hurting, they want to know that one thing more than anything

Huckabee: GOP Must Talk About Stagnant Wages

On February 19, the Washington Times reported on an appearance former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee gave on Fox News’ The Kelly File the previous day. During the interview, Huckabee stated: “I also think … that my comments regarding the bottom 90 percent of American workers whose wages have been stagnant for 40 years — Republicans aren’t [talking] about that very much, and if we don’t talk about it, Hillary Clinton’s [going to] be the next president.” You can watch the full interview here.  

Rand Paul Discusses Bitcoin and Alternative Currencies

In a Bloomberg article from February 12, Senator Rand Paul discussed his views on Bitcoin and other alternative currencies. He stated that his concern with Bitcoin “was whether or not something has real value. I could imagine a kind of coin that was exchangeable.” He felt that if Bitcoin, “Wal-coin,” or a similar company currency was exchangeable for stock in that company, it would give real value to the currency. That currency would, in Sen. Paul’s opinion, raise profit margins for those companies, which he believes would be an interesting prospect. You can read the full story here.

Earth to GOP: Talk About Rising Costs

When it comes to economics, Republicans love talking about jobs, jobs, jobs. They cite real unemployment numbers that are far worse than what the public is told. They cite record numbers of Americans leaving the work force. They talk about cold, hard numbers. The GOP is obsessed with talking about jobs—but why? The vast majority of voters already have a job. We also know that government doesn’t create jobs—that’s what the private sector is for—so when conservatives engage the Democrats on the jobs issue, we’re at a huge disadvantage. They get to play Santa Claus, and we’re left talking vaguely about

It’s Not Income Inequality, Stupid

David Shribman, editor of the Pittsburgh Post Gazette, is worried about the GOP economic message.  In an article called  “What Isn’t Being Said About 2016,” Shribman speaks with great compassion of “the anguish Republican candidates are having in trying to figure out how to address economic issues.”  Shribman describes the problem as “conservatives struggling to address the wealth gap.” Ah, Republicans don’t be fooled, for this, of course, puts the argument in liberal Democratic terms. The income or wealth  “gap” is not the problem voters care about.  Their problem (and ours) is the stagnation of American workers who are running harder and harder

The Hill: Rand Paul Fires Back at ‘Audit the Fed’ Critics

On February 5, The Hill reported on criticism of Senator Rand Paul’s Audit the Fed bill. In response, Sen. Paul was quoted as saying, “Citizens have the right to know why the Fed’s policies have resulted in a stagnant economy and record numbers of people dropping out of the workforce.” You can read the full story here.

Fed Reserve Empire Strikes Back at Rand Paul

In an orchestrated orgy of protests, Fed governors and regional bank presidents have roasted Sen. Rand Paul and his co-sponsors for reintroducing a bill mandating an audit of the Fed. Loretta Mester, president of the Cleveland Fed, wants us to know that such a thought is “misguided.” Why? “They really are about allowing political considerations to influence monetary policy decisions,” she said in a speech in Columbus. “This would be a tremendous mistake, because it would ultimately lead to poorer economic performance.” What performance? Presumably the Fed wants a pat on the back for the zero-interest-rate policy of the last

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