This Week in Economics: 4 News Stories You Need to Know About

Here is an update on some of the recent stories that I have covered for The National Pulse: 1.) D.C. City Council unanimously votes to raise taxes on Uber…and a ton of other things. The Washington Times reports: The 13-member council approved funding Metro by raising the tax on ride-hailing services Lyft and Uber from 1 percent to 6 percent, as well increasing the sales tax, the car rental and leasing tax, the hotel sales tax, and the tax on alcohol sold in liquor stores. Owners of properties assessed at more than $5 million will pay an increased 24 cents

Surprise! Wasteful Government Spending Abounds in Recent Omnibus Bill

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation In her Liberty Minute titled “Love My Dog,” Helen Krieble identifies a major problem with the federal government: A veterinarian in Massachusetts is studying how women react when they’re shown photographs of their children and their dogs. She hopes to find out whether mothers love their dogs as much as their children. Like millions of Americans my dog is a treasured family member and a reliable companion, so why does that relationship require scientific study? The federal government paid $370,000

Fake News Alert: No, Trump’s Tax Cuts Aren’t Blowing Up the Debt

Recently, the Congressional Budget Office (CBO) released a report stating the national debt will increase by an additional $1.9 trillion over the next 10 years due to Trump’s tax cuts. Unfortunately, while the growing national debt has led to hand-wringing from Republicans and Democrats, a logic-defying narrative has emerged on what is to blame. Therefore, it needs to be made clear: No, the Trump tax cuts are not blowing up the debt. It should first be stated that the CBO’s numbers ought to be taken with a grain of salt, because the CBO is almost always wrong — quite often, spectacularly so.

Congress Explodes Deficits, Expands Nanny State with Disastrous Omnibus Bill

Tragically for our children’s futures and freedoms — but predictably, as we warned here and here — Congress heeded very few general principles or President Trump’s good ideas about preserving freedom and privacy, decreasing the federal footprint in education, supporting programs that work, or maintaining fiscal discipline. The House yesterday passed the $1.3 trillion omnibus-spending bill — that will only fund the government for six months — by a vote of 256-197. The Senate followed early this morning with a vote of 65-32. The damage this bill will do the nation’s fiscal health and to issues outside of education is well discussed

Trump’s Budget Cuts Fed Role in Education — But Will Congress Follow His Lead?

The Trump administration’s fiscal 2019 education budget contains many reductions and eliminations that should give hope to parents and privacy advocates. But sadly, congressional appropriators seem almost as genetically incapable of eliminating ineffective, invasive, or harmful programs — despite mountains of data clearly documenting these programs’ uselessness — as they are of exerting any sort of fiscal discipline, as documented by the budget deal discussed last week that will only increase the $21 trillion deficit. So unfortunately, this budget will likely be dead on arrival in Congress unless citizens act. Here are some highlights that activists can use as starting

Have Republicans Killed Fiscal Conservatism?

Fiscal conservatism is dead. After eight years of legitimate and accurate criticism of the Obama administration for their excessive and irresponsible spending, Republicans, now in control of Washington, have elected to follow suit and extend the same big government policy of capricious expenditure. In a middle of the night vote last Thursday, the Senate opted to end the hour-long government shutdown initiated by Senator Rand Paul’s (R-Ky.) filibuster against the abominable budget deal agreed to by leaders of both parties. With President Trump signing the bill into law, the new budget will lift caps on non-defense spending by over $300

Congress Explodes Deficit, Expands Nanny State Programs with Budget Deal

Despite courageous efforts by Senator Rand Paul, other fiscally conservative senators, and the House Freedom Caucus, as well as the objections of pro-amnesty Democrat members in both chambers, Congress passed a two-year budget deal early this morning that ballooned spending by $300 billion over the next two years, significantly enlarging the deficit. The bill also ended the military and domestic sequester and raised the debt ceiling by $1 trillion. The Senate vote was 71-28, while the House vote was 240-186. The government is now funded through March 23rd, which will give the Congress time to write out a detailed budget

How Will Republicans Fare in 2018? Keep an Eye on This New Jersey Race…

Despite the excellent budget put forward by President Trump last year, federal spending continues to flow in a business-as-usual manner — much to the frustration of taxpayers. The Republican Congress has continued the unfortunate trend of passing numerous, short-term continuing resolutions (CRs) to fund the government (albeit, in part due to the challenge of achieving 60 votes in the Senate). These continuing resolutions do little to serve the interest of taxpayers nor our military which desires a stable and predictable allocation of funds for the future. The most recent continuing resolution, passed by Congress yesterday, will fund the government for