Supreme Court Decision Lifting Ban on Sports Betting Is a Win for Freedom

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation.  In her Liberty Minute titled “The Big Gulp,” Helen Krieble discusses a local government policy that many people immediately recognized as an egregious overreach: There have been many news stories about one mayor’s drive to ban large soft drinks. Nearly everyone thought the effort was a classic case of government overreach. I’ve never bought a Big Gulp soda, but I cherish my right to do so. We all understand the dangers of too much sugar in our diets, but most people

Parents vs. the Nanny State: Who’s Really in Charge of America’s Children?

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation In her Liberty Minute titled “Free Range Kids,” Helen Krieble exposes an area in which the government has very little business interfering but often does so anyway: the upbringing of children. A couple in Connecticut decided to let their kids walk home from school alone every day like many of us did growing up. But nowadays people are so worried about overprotecting children that somebody called the police and the parents are now charged with a crime. But these parents

Big Business and the Administrative State: A Match Made in the Swamp

This article was originally posted at The Hill and co-authored by Jane Robbins, an attorney and senior fellow at the American Principles Project. “The swamp” has become a catch-all term for what’s wrong with Washington. The word — also known as the administrative state — evokes images of arrogant bureaucrats enforcing their preferred policies regardless of the desires of the voters. But a key component of the swamp isn’t housed in the granite jungle of D.C. but in corporate boardrooms across the country. A leftist professor once claimed that “the myth of individual greatness is a myth.” The same could be said of the

Can America Achieve Energy Independence? Only If We Don’t Overregulate…

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation In her Liberty Minute titled “Change the Rules,” Helen Krieble examines a way that regulations have held back American energy independence: I worry about being dependent on foreign countries for our energy. New discoveries of oil and natural gas in the U.S. and new technologies for producing it responsibly have made that possible, yet our own government has made it almost impossible to produce our own energy through burdensome and expensive regulations. If we look through the lens of liberty

Unhappy Hour? Why This State’s Regulations on Bars’ Ads Go Too Far

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation In her Liberty Minute titled “Modern Sign Language,” Helen Krieble discusses unfair advertisement laws in some American towns: There were once so many highway billboards that people complained of sign pollution. So today many cities have restrictive sign codes. But are they about highway beautification or government picking winners and losers? Towns from Redman, Washington, to Fairfax, Virginia, allow signs along the streets for political campaigns and for real estate — but not for any other businesses. One town allowed employees

Regulations Gone Wrong: Why These Unfair Texas Laws Need to Go

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation. For years, the government’s answer to almost every problem has been to impose regulations. But while bureaucrats see such rules as a necessary way to protect citizens, they are blind to the fact that these regulations violate Americans’ constitutional right to equal protection under the law, by allowing government to favor some groups over others. In her Liberty Minute titled “Hot Air in Houston,” Helen Krieble provides a perfect example of a local government picking winners and losers — and

Do People Need Protection from Mobile Games? One State Thinks So.

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation. In her Liberty Minute titled “Serve Yourself,” Helen Krieble discusses an example of two states’ governments overstepping their bounds in the name of protecting their citizens: I can remember when gas stations had both self service and full service islands, and many drivers enjoyed the full service choice. Attendants would run out to the car, pump the gas, air up your tires, wash the windshield, and check the oil. When consumers found that self-service resulted in cheaper gas though, most

Why Is This State Banning Moms from Selling Home-Baked Goods?

This article is part of a series focusing on Lens of Liberty, a project of the Vernon K. Krieble Foundation. In her Liberty Minute entitled “Moving the State,” Helen Krieble talks about an interesting story which bears some resemblance to a legal battle currently being fought in New Jersey: A young man in Kentucky helped his sister move and realized that might be a good living. So he and a friend posted an ad on Craigslist, and the new moving business took off. Before long, they had five trucks and thirty employees. But then, the state stepped in requiring a