Are Trump and the GOP Finally Listening to Parents on Common Core?

It seems that all of the grassroots efforts to reach the Trump administration with Common Core-related concerns are finally starting to bear fruit. These concerns include Betsy DeVos’ pro-Common Core record, the disturbingly large number of Jeb Bush foundation employees and alumni staffing the U.S. Department of Education (USED), and the prominent decrease in the president’s discussion of Common Core since assuming office after he discussed it at nearly every campaign stop. In news just released by Politico yesterday in their Morning Education update, it appears that pro-Common Core New Mexico Education Secretary Hannah Skandera has been rejected for the

4 Ways Trump Can Keep His Promises on Education

Despite consistently promising to end Common Core in nearly every stump speech as a candidate, which was likely one key aspect of his stunning election victory, those words “Common Core” seem to have disappeared from now-President Donald Trump’s political lexicon. The academically inferior, developmentally inappropriate, and psychologically manipulative standards were not mentioned in either his CPAC speech or his very well-received address to a joint session of Congress. This has been ably pointed out by many colleagues in the education freedom fight, like Frank Cannon, president of the American Principles Project, and journalistic observers of the education scene like Fred

President Trump’s Superb Speech Ignored One Crucial Issue

President Trump gave a great speech last night. Over and over, he has gone out of his way to prove himself as a man of his word: what he promised during the campaign, he is going to deliver, and for the most part that is what he told the American people in his first address to Congress. But in his non-State of the Union address last night, two words that were a core part of his campaign commitment to the American people were curiously absent: Common Core. Ending Common Core was one of Trump’s earliest and most persistent campaign promises.

President-elect Trump: Honor Phyllis Schlafly by Picking a Secretary of Education She’d Endorse

On election night when it became apparent that we were witnessing a truly remarkable and historic event, one great, American patriot came to mind — the late, conservative icon Phyllis Schlafly, who passed away this past fall at the age of 92. Lost in the media coverage since is the fact that it is Phyllis Schlafly, yet again, whom Americans have to thank for the biggest political upset since the election of Ronald Reagan. As if already being “regarded as one of the two or three most important Americans of the last half of the 20th century” (as described by

Schools Ditch Academics for Emotional Manipulation

This summer the Collaborative for Academic, Social and Emotional Learning (CASEL) announced it had chosen eight states to collaborate on creating K-12 “social emotional learning” (SEL) standards. All students, from kindergartners through high-school seniors, would be measured on five “non-cognitive” factors: self-awareness, self-management, social awareness, relationship skills, and responsible decision-making. Under such a system teachers become essentially therapists, and students become essentially patients. Supposedly this will clear away the psychological deadwood that obstructs a student’s path to academic achievement. But less than two months later, two of the CASEL states (Tennessee and Georgia) have withdrawn from the initiative. Parents have begun

New Report: Winners and Losers of Common Core

Teresa Mull of the Heartland Institute writes about a new report analyzing the enormous funding of the Common Core national standards — where the money came from, what it was used for, and especially, who benefited from the entire endeavor. Hint: It wasn’t the students. The report, “Smart Money? Philanthropic and Federal Funding for the Common Core,” was produced by scholars at Penn State University. Unlike many academic discussions of Common Core, it recognizes that the national standards are designed for technical, data-driven outcomes rather than genuine education. It also recognizes the dearth of evidence that the Common Core-type of

Civil Rights for Me, But Not for Thee

The Obama administration’s campaign to force schools to open up restrooms, locker rooms, overnight sleeping accommodations, and probably sports teams to students of either sex is not going well. The latest opposition comes from several brave students in Minnesota’s Virginia Public Schools, who are reminding the administration that they, too, have rights. The Alliance Defending Freedom (ADF) has filed a lawsuit on behalf of these students and their parents, alleging the U.S. Departments of Education (USED) and Justice (DOJ) and the Virginia Public Schools are endangering student privacy and safety by instituting the DNA-denying policies. The complaint describes in shocking

Not a Conspiracy Theory: Educrats Discover Alarming New Ways to Data Mine Our Children

Opponents of the progressive-education elitists on issues such as the Common Core scheme are routinely accused of spouting paranoid conspiracy theories. This smear is particularly common in discussing technology-driven “digital learning.” It’s ridiculous, educrats say, to suggest that schools — meaning the government —and their corporate ed-tech allies will be probing the psyches of our children. Track children’s eye movements or scan their brains? That’s crazy talk! Except that federally funded researchers now brag about doing just that. Ed Week reports that Carnegie Mellon University researchers are using brain scans to create computer software to adapt to what a student

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