dna abortion
Fetus with DNA umbilical cord

False Positive DNA-Tech Testing is Leading to More Abortions.

A shocking new report shows that Silicon Valley firms have been provided false positives to expectant mothers, leading them in some instances to kill their unborn children.

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An examination by the New York Times has found that 85 percent of prenatal blood tests for rare chromosomal disorders provided false positive results to expectant mothers. On average, only 15 out of every 85 tests came back with accurate information on their child’s genetic make-up, potentially leading many mothers to abort perfectly healthy children.

The article describes a series of case studies of expectant mothers who received normal ultrasounds, but were told shortly after that blood tests confirmed their children would be born with serious ailments and mental illness. These mothers then had to either pay for additional testing to confirm the results, give birth to a child who may not live, or choose to kill their unborn children before birth.

More than a third of mothers across the United States may have been told, falsely, that their children would be born with syndromes like DiGeorge, 1p36, Cri-du-Chat syndrome, Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome, Turner syndrome, and Prader-Willi and Angelman syndromes. In the case of Prader-Willi syndrome, 90 percent of positive tests were false.

Prader-Willi syndrome renders children unable to live independently as adults. Other disorders tested for included intellectual disabilities, heart defects, shortened life spans and high rates of infant mortality. Positive results for these disorders or “microdeletions” were 70-90 percent false.

A study from 2014 found that six percent of expectant mothers who tested positive for a DNA disorder obtained an abortion. The Times also quoted a Boston Globe article in which a local doctor described performing three abortions following false positive results.

Follow-up tests to confirm the risk of such disorders all come with a heightened risk of miscarriage. Almost all of the disorders tested for, except for Downs Syndrome, are comparable in risk to “running mammograms on kids,” said one obstetrician and geneticist at the University of California, San Francisco. They went on to say that these tests are “purely a marketing thing.”

A number of Silicon Valley-based technology companies are to blame for this heinous attack and exploitation of American mothers, along with the unnecessary deaths of their unborn children. The brochures and test result sheets used by these companies describe the tests as “near certain” in  their accuracy. Each company offering the blood test used fraudulent marketing terms like “reliable,” “highly accurate,” and “total confidence.”

The only thing these companies could rely on from their fraud and murder of unborn children is the massive amounts of wealth their gained from providing expectant mothers with incorrect medical information. The market for these genetic tests was estimated by one NY Times analyst as $600 million into the billions.

The exploitation depends on mothers being ill-versed in the medical nuance of genetic disorders. Some companies, such as Myriad Genetics, offers a test for a syndrome that is so rare that it only impacts one in every 100,000 children. It is unknown how many mothers were told that their child would be born with this syndrome, but thousands of tests have been conducted.

In the case of another company, Natera, more than 400,000 screenings were performed in 2020 alone. Natera tested 10 percent of pregnant women in America last year, with potentially 90 percent of those women being told that their children would be born with a significant developmental disorder.

Mothers and fathers are expected to pay anywhere from $698 to $1,349 for the tests, most of which are less than 20 percent accurate when providing positive results. Natera is currently valued at $8.8 billion, and made a large amount of this money from providing mothers with false and misleading information about the health of their unborn child.

Many doctors are unaware of how many false positives are found by the companies in question. Either that, or many doctors choose not to tell their patients that the test results are almost always wrong. It is unknown whether such doctors receive compensation for performing the tests in question.

The mental and physical toll on expectant mothers is described in detail throughout the expose. On top of the horrendous stress from the false positive results, expectant mothers were also told by nurses that they would have to make a very “tough decision” related to their future child’s “quality of life.”


Kay Smythe

Kay Smythe is a writer and researcher specializing in social capital. Her work has been published internationally for more than half her life. She currently resides in the USA.