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On Day 61, Jen Psaki Claimed an “Anti-Violence Comic” Would Help Stop Violence at the U.S. Border… It Was Discontinued in 2018.

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White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki cited an anti-violence comic circulating in El Salvador as one of the ways the Biden regime is trying to stall migration into the United States. The only problem? The comic was discontinued in 2018, The National Pulse can reveal.

Comical Psaki.

On Monday, press secretary Jen Psaki assured reporters that the Biden White House is doing everything possible to address the crisis at the border—such as running radio ads, supporting “creative” efforts, and pouring money into countries whose citizens are escaping cartel violence.

“We’ve placed an estimated 17,118 radio ads in Brazil, El Salvador, Guatemala, and Honduras since January 21st in Spanish, Portuguese, and six indigenous languages,” she said.

Psaki also reported that America is also backing more “creative” approaches, such as comic books that discourage violence.

“We’re also taking creative approaches in different countries to make sure we’re reaching people . . . As an example, Embassy San Salvador—“Oscuro” comic book and animated show seeks to deter irregular migration by addressing violence as a driver. Content focused on [violence] reduction reached 240,000 young Salvadorans in the targeted audience. The two animated episodes in this past year have been viewed by 3.6 million individuals.”

Oscuro,” however, was censored and removed from circulation in 2018 by El Salvador’s National Civil Police.

“The Police censored the comic because it did not tolerate the character’s gang past, but also because it denounced an extrajudicial execution committed by the policemen in the comic, a metaphor that evokes human rights violations committed by real police officers,” reads an English translation of an article from elfaro.net. “After the comic was seized, the Police tried to analyze [‘Oscuro’] and even made a psychological profile of the characters that appear in it, to try to justify why it was not a valid violence prevention tool.”

VP Has Been To The Border… Before.

Vice President Kamala Harris responded with laughter when asked if she had any plans to visit the border. 

“Not today,” she said, laughing, “but I have before and I’m sure I will again.” Harris was one of more than a dozen 2020 presidential hopefuls who made an appearance at the Homestead detention facility in the summer of 2019, a facility whose fate is yet to be determined as Biden’s federal agencies grapple with the immigration surge. Harris was in Jacksonville, Florida, on Monday as part of the “Help is Here” tour to promote President Joe Biden’s already-popular economic stimulus plan. 

Images Emerge Of Biden’s Detention Facilities.

On Monday, Texas Democrat Rep. Henry Cuellar released photos from an unnamed source depicting the conditions at a detention facility in Donna, Texas. The photos show masked children and teens sitting in overcrowded soft-sided “pods” with no distancing protocols in place. Teens can be seen napping next to each other on plastic mats with foil blankets.

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) followed the photo release with its own footage about 24 hours later, which showed children wearing masks and having temperatures checked, a toddler in a playpen being watched by an adult male caretaker, children playing outdoors, and shelves stocked with essential supplies. The clips released by CBP depict two separate facilities in Donna and El Paso, Texas.

Project Veritas also shared images from Donna, Texas, that depict overcrowded conditions in the “pods,” reporting that there are at least 50 cases of coronavirus in the facility.

The White House announced Monday that Ambassador Roberta Jacobson and other officials would be traveling to Mexico that day, with some going on to Guatemala, to “develop an effective and humane plan of action to manage migration.”

Confronted on Sunday with the administration’s refusal to call the situation a “crisis,” Secretary Alejandro Mayorkas said, “We’re not haggling over language, we’re focused on mission . . . I will not use language that is not applicable.”


Staff Writer

The National Pulse is a part of the American Principles Project.