Day 15: Biden’s America is Closed For Business But Open For Immigration.

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America’s schools are shuttered and 10 million jobs are gone. But on Day 15 of the Biden regime, an ambitious goal for refugee resettlement was top of mind.

Where’s Hunter? A Bookstore Near You.

The personal memoirs of Hunter Biden, who is currently under extensive federal investigation, will be published by Simon & Schuster this April. Yes, the same Simon & Schuster that nuked Sen. Josh Hawley’s “The Tyranny of Big Tech” in January.

On Thursday, a reporter asked if the book, titled “Beautiful Things,” would be subject to a clearance review.

Press secretary Jen Psaki did not answer that question, but offered a statement from Joe and Jill Biden (“in their personal capacity as his parents”) from the podium: “We admire our son Hunter’s strength and courage to talk openly about his addiction so that others might see themselves in his journey and find hope.”

P.S. We still have “Where’s Hunter” swag in our swag store. 

America’s Place In The World? Not First.

Good luck deciphering Biden’s opener at the State Department Thursday:

“We must meet the new moment accelerating global challenges — from the pandemic to the climate crisis to nuclear proliferation — challenging the will only to be solved by nations working together and in common.”

The rest of the speech elucidated Biden’s big priorities for U.S. foreign policy: Restore America’s “moral authority,” strengthen international institutions, and advance “a foreign policy for the middle class”—in contrast with Trump-era trade wars on behalf of the American worker.

The president’s remarks mentioned Russia, China, and (briefly) Iran. He addressed the so-called Muslim ban, but made no mention of ISIS or Islamic terrorism.

The particulars of Biden’s vision for moral leadership, outlined in a White House fact sheet, include:

  • Rescinding policies that limit refugee resettlement;
  • Promoting the rights of LGBTQI+ persons around the world and combat criminalization of such status or conduct.
  • Diversifying and modernizing the national security workforce.
  • Integrating economic, health, and environmental security into national security objectives.
  • Integrating cabinet officials from domestically-focused agencies into national security decision-making.

(Re)Open The Floodgates.

As part of his unveiling of national security priorities, Biden aims to raise the refugee cap to 125,000 during his first full fiscal year in office, beginning October 1, 2021, he announced Thursday.

President Trump’s reduction of the refugee limit to 15,000 last year marked a historic low.

President Obama set a cap of 116,000 refugees in his final year in office—and Biden aims to beat it by 9,000 in the midst of a global pandemic.

Student Debt.

Biden is ready to sign a bill from Congress cancelling $10,000 of federal student loan debt per person, Psaki said Thursday—but some Democratic lawmakers are calling on the president to get it done though executive action. 

Dozens of Democrats, including Schumer, Warren, Presley, reintroduced a bicameral resolution calling on Biden to cancel $50,000 per borrower.

So that’s a new life for migrants, $10,000 for gender studies graduates, and $1400 for you. If you’re lucky.


Staff Writer

The National Pulse is a part of the American Principles Project.