Day 75: Hunter Biden Lovefest.

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On Day 75, the adult son of the current U.S. president was welcomed onto “CBS This Morning” with open arms for tearful talk of trauma and catharsis. 

Biden Disapproval Ticks Up After Easter Sunday.

President Joe Biden’s disapproval rating has again reached 51 percent, according to new Rasmussen data released Monday. Disapproval rose to 51 percent for the first time on March 25-26, 2021. This rating clocks in below average for U.S. presidents in their first quarter, with Biden’s approach to the border crisis and gun-related issues drawing particular ire. 

12th Overflow Detention Facility To Open In California.

The Long Beach Convention Center is expected to open as a holding space for 1,000 unaccompanied migrant minors under a 90-120 day contract between the city and the Department of Health and Human Services. This would be the twelfth overflow facility to open under Biden, and California’s second. 

“As of Monday, 14,287 children were in the custody of the Refugee Resettlement office after being transferred from Customs and Border Protection,” the Los Angeles Times reports.

Vice President and onetime border czar Kamala Harris spent several hours in Oakland, California, on Monday to stoke support for Biden’s $2.3 trillion infrastructure, workforce, and climate plan, but did not visit the southern border or the San Diego Convention Center, recently repurposed to house migrant girls between the ages of 13-17. 

Hunter Book Tour/Therapy Session Continues On CBS.

Following an Easter Sunday book promo appearance in which he revealed that he used to scrounge for cocaine in the carpet and end up smoking Parmesan cheese instead, Hunter Biden was back on CBS on Monday morning with Anthony Mason. The publisher of “Beautiful Things,” Gallery Books, is an imprint of Simon & Schuster, which is a division of ViacomCBS.

In the CBS informercial/therapy session hosted by a major news network for the son of the president of the United States, Hunter attributed his cocaine addiction to “the feeling of never fitting in. It’s that hole, and you don’t know what it is, exactly,” Hunter said. “I am more convinced now that trauma is at the center of it.”

Afterward, Gayle King asked, “Is this cathartic for him?” Mason agreed—having clearly made efforts to deeply understand the thinking of President Joe Biden’s son—that based on what another former addict had told him, the book did seem to be part of Hunter Biden’s personal catharsis.

“If it helps him get better, I’m sure Joe Biden’s all for it,” Tony Dokoupil chimed in.

Revisiting Biden’s Four Pinocchios.

In the briefing room Monday, both Peter Doocy of Fox and Kaitlan Collins of CNN revisited Biden’s four-Pinocchios election law claims, which press secretary Jen Psaki had originally defended. This time, Psaki stuck with the message that “fundamentally,” Biden wants to make it easier to vote, and the Georgia law doesn’t do that.

From the exchange between Psaki and Doocy:

Q: Is the President going to change the way that he talks about the new Georgia voting law? Because in that interview that you referenced, he said, the law would end voting “at five o’clock when working people are just getting off.” And he said it would end voting hours early so working people can’t cast their vote after their shift is over. But the Washington Post gave that claim four Pinocchios because that part of the law gives counties the option to extend voting hours. And so I’m just curious if the President is going to change the way that he’s talking about it.

PSAKI: Well, fundamentally, the President doesn’t believe it should be made harder to vote; he believes it should be easier. And this bill makes it harder to request and return an absentee ballot. It collapses the length of Georgia’s runoff election, making it harder for large jurisdictions to offer early voting. It imposes rigid new restrictions on local officials’ ability to set polling hours to suit the needs of voters in their county. Those are all pieces of the bill. So his view is that we need to make it easier and not harder to vote, and that will continue to be what he advocates for.


Staff Writer

The National Pulse is a part of the American Principles Project.