Vice President Joe Biden eats ice cream during a visit to Little Man Ice Cream, in Denver, Tuesday, July 21, 2015. (AP Photo/Brennan Linsley)

The Big Scoop: On Day 127 The Media Celebrated Biden’s “Chocolate Chocolate Chip.”

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On Day 127, the leader of the free world tells his political opponents to “eat some chocolate chocolate chip.” 

Big Scoop!

It’s unclear who enjoyed the treat more when President Joe Biden stopped at Honey Hut ice cream shop in Cleveland, Ohio: Biden or his groupies traveling press corps.

They called it “possibly the most Biden thing ever.”

They asked him what he ordered—”chocolate chocolate chip”—and audibly whooped and cheered with delight.

They tweeted out the flavors list.

https://twitter.com/kathrynw5/status/1397997297317781504?s=20

They asked, “Mr. President, what is your message to Republicans who are prepared to block the January 6 commission?” Biden replied, “Eat some chocolate chocolate chip.” (“Yeah, eat some ice cream!”, reporters can be heard exclaiming back.)

Don’t forget what CNN had to say about former president Donald Trump’s dessert habits back in 2017: “President Donald Trump is living every child’s dream: More ice cream.”

Biden was in Cleveland to deliver remarks on the economy. In the course of his speech, Biden waved a list of Republicans who “back in their districts, they’re bragging about the Rescue Plan”—namely, the Restaurant Revitalization Fund—without having voted for it.

“Some people have no shame,” Biden said.

Well, he’s not wrong.

Biden Brags On America’s Fortune Under His Regime.

In his Cleveland remarks, Biden made much of bringing the economy back from the brink of collapse and magnificently restoring jobs to America (never mind his lackluster performance on jobs last month, in particular).

His venue on Thursday, Cuyahoga Community College (or “Tri-C”), was one of Biden’s intended destinations on the campaign trail in March 2020, before his presidential campaign was relocated to his basement.

“When our event here was canceled in March, our economy was on the brink of collapse,” Biden said. “When I was sworn in, there were 10 million fewer jobs in America, and a lot here in Ohio. But in my first three months in office, the economy has added back 500,000 jobs per month.” (That’s the average figure preferred by the Biden White House.) 

Continuing this economic momentum, Biden said, will unlock America’s future. He repeated the false and repeatedly-debunked Moody’s Analytics misquote again: “Moody’s—not a liberal think tank—Wall Street, Moody’s—says my plan will increase the size of our economy by $4.5 trillion—Moody’s—$4.5 trillion over the next decade, and create well over 16 million new good-paying jobs.” The Moody’s Analytics study in question does not say this. It projects that 16.3 million new jobs will be added through 2030 regardless of whether or not Biden’s American Jobs Plan is passed.

But don’t worry: Injecting trillions upon trillions into the U.S. economy won’t hurt a bit. In fact: “If we make these investments now… your children or grandchildren will look back and say this was the moment when America won the future,” Biden said. 

VP Recruits Private Sector To Help Solve Illegal Immigration.

“Root causes czar” Kamala Harris has launched an initiative to recruit private sector businesses to invest in the Northern Triangle. The U.S. government will be pouring money into the Northern Triangle and Latin America, but it won’t be enough: it’s time to deploy the “unique resources and expertise” of the private sector.

“Vice President Kamala Harris announced today a Call to Action for businesses and social enterprises to make new, significant commitments to help send a signal of hope to the people of the region and sustainably address the root causes of migration by promoting economic opportunity,” per the White House fact sheet.

Companies participating in the launch include Accion, Bancolombia, Chobani, Davivienda, Duolingo, the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, Mastercard, Microsoft, Nespresso, Pro Mujer, the Tent Partnership for Refugees, and the World Economic Forum. These companies will collaborate with the Partnership for Central America on six focus areas that include workforce development plus a slate of climate, energy, and health-related initiatives.

It’s like the Pledge To America’s Workers, but not to America’s workers.


Staff Writer

The National Pulse is a part of the American Principles Project.