The New CRT: ‘Human Sexuality’ Program Teaches Kids About Oral Sex, Claims Boys Can Wear Dresses.

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Texas’ updated Human Sexuality and Responsibility (HSR) curriculum exposes children to explicit sexual concepts and LGBTQ+ narratives at young ages, The National Pulse can reveal.

A detailed look at 2020 class materials and lesson plans for elementary and middle school students in the Austin Independent School District (SD) provides a detailed window of the program, based on the National Sex Education Standards, updated in 2020 by the Future of Sex Education (FoSE) Initiative.

Part of this initiative is Advocates for Youth, which expressed its satisfaction at the “updated indicators for consent and healthy relationships, gender identity and sexual orientation, and racial justice and equity.” The standards apply to K-12 school programs, and were developed by individuals from many organizations, including the mass abortion industry leader, Planned Parenthood Federation of America.

Lowering the Standards, And The Tone.

The rules blend more traditional sex education with far-left ideas of transgenderism, abortion normalization, and promiscuity.

The standards state that by the end of second grade (ages 7 and 8), students should be able to “identify different kinds of family structures,” and know the names for body parts “including male and female anatomy.”

By the end of high school, students should be able to “describe the human sexual response cycle,” and “differentiate between biological sex, sexual orientation, and gender identity and expression.”

High schoolers are also supposed to advocate for school policies that endorse the latter differences and be able to “Compare and contrast the laws relating to pregnancy, adoption, abortion and parenting.”

Advocates for Youth stresses “LGBTQ Rights” and supports the “#FreeThePill” movement for easier and wider contraceptive access.

The group – which claims funding from government as well as traditional far-left donors such as the Open Society Foundation (via ‘NEO Philanthropy’) – also pushes for sex education that “includes information about sex, sexuality, relationships, contraception and condoms, and how to protect yourself and plan your future” rather than “denying them [young people] information and simply telling them not to have sex.”

Sexual Harassment. 

Austin SD has made many of its HSR materials available online.

For third grade teachers, the lesson plan calls for an explanation and detailed listing of the parts of the male and female reproductive systems and “Pre-cut out images, body system names, parts and functions.” The lesson plan directs the teacher to hand out the images of the reproductive systems’ parts to the third grade students and have the students match these images together accurately. The teacher then explains what actions the reproductive systems have and how each of the systems’ parts function in human reproduction. Finally, the teacher describes scenarios where touching from others may be uncomfortable or unwanted, including a scenario which subtly describes sexual harassment from an elder.

Another lesson plan for third graders is “Puberty and Adolescent Development.” In this lesson, the teacher is to describe in some detail how boys’ and girls’ bodies change during puberty, including what happens to the reproductive systems.

For fourth graders, there is an “Anatomy and Physiology” handout on which students are supposed to label detailed drawings of the male and female reproductive systems and do exercises using the various terms. The lesson plan on puberty calls for more detail on the reproductive systems’ development. Students are presented with different scenarios in which boys or girls have to deal with a certain bodily change. On this topic, the level of detail in the HSR lessons increases somewhat for each grade.

By sixth grade, HSR calls for teachers to describe and discuss “sexual contact & sexual intercourse” as part of the class on “ABSTINENCE TO PREVENT PREGNANCY.”

Part of this lesson is an activity where teachers hand out cards describing various actions so students can identify which are part of abstinence and which are not, including different types of sexual activity such as “oral sex.” Teachers are advised to tell students, if the topic comes up, that masturbation does not result in pregnancy or “health problems” but may not be approved by some families or religions.

Sixth graders also have a lesson on STDs/STIs and HIV in which the teacher describes how these diseases happen and are transmitted.

One class handout for seventh graders includes instructions on how to use a male condom properly, including drawings and instructions on how to put on a condom and take it off.

In eighth grade, a class handout includes not only instructions on condom use but also a list of various contraceptive methods and accompanying images. Students are supposed to rank the methods of preventing the “risks” of sexual activity according to effectiveness. There is also a class called “Managing the Consequences of Sexual Activity” which focuses on pregnancy and STDs.

Identity.

The first lesson plan is for third graders is “Identity,” and involves an exercise where students are asked if anyone ever called them a “wrong name” relative to their identity. There is also a lesson on “Identity” for fourth graders.

The fifth grade “Identity” lesson plan instructs the teacher to “Define sexual orientation as the romantic attraction of an individual to someone of the same gender or a different gender.” The fifth grade lesson plan also includes the definitions “Gender: the way a person identifies him/herself in relation to being male, female, neither, or both,” and “Sexual orientation: the romantic attraction of an individual to someone of the same gender or a different gender.” The teacher is then supposed to explain to the fifth graders that “gender and sexual orientation varies from one person to the next… Confusion about gender and sexual orientation is normal.”

The sixth grade “Identity” lesson plan focuses on “gender identity, gender expression, and sexual orientation,” including “stereotypes” and “inequality.” Suggested stereotypes are “girls cannot play sports, boys cannot wear dresses.” The sixth grade students are given a handout with exercises on various LGBTQ+ terms and a “Harmful Stereotypes Worksheet.”

The seventh grade “Identity” lesson centers around “Creating a Safe Space” and “Stereotyping” based on “Gender, Race, Culture, or Group.” The emphasized conclusion is that “Gender Roles ARE Stereotypes,” and the teacher’s materials include the “Genderbread Person.”

Finally, in the eighth grade lesson plan for “Sexuality and Sexual Health,” besides reviewing how the reproductive systems function and what happens when they do, students are invited to examine and develop their “self-concept” and the teacher is to explain that “‘sexuality’ is much broader than the act of ‘sex.'”

Detailed definitions from the WHO of sexuality and sexual health are provided as basis for a large part of the lesson. A link is also provided to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as a credible source of information on sexuality and sexual health.

The new curriculum comes as parents across the United States are protesting at school boards for the teaching of “Critical Race Theory,” an anti-white, Marxist teaching method with black supremacy and racial division at its core.


Catherine Salgado

Catherine Salgado is a double-major in Classical Languages and Theology and a former contributor to The National Pulse.