Dems Demand House BAN of Pro-Trump Congressmen, Use ‘Force’ to Disenfranchise Over 92 MILLION Americans in Hitler-Style ‘Enabling Act’

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New Jersey Congressman Bill Pascrell and The Week magazine writer Ryan Cooper have urged Democratic Party leadership to ostracize Republicans who supported President Trump’s legal claims, in a move not dissimilar to Nazi Fuhrer Adolf Hitler’s Enabling Act which proscribed opposition political parties.

The suggestion perhaps underscores the importance of Republicans holding the Senate on January 5th when Georgians are set to vote in their run-off which will decide the composition of the upper chamber.

Pascrell, 83, tweeted: “The text of the 14th Amendment expressly forbids Members of Congress from engaging in rebellion against the United States. Trying to overturn a democratic election and install a dictator seems a pretty clear example of that’.”

The move would immediately disenfranchise over 92 million Americans – including non-Republican voters in Republican-voting districts – per 2015 data according to calculations by The National Pulse.

Pascrell’s demand that 92 million members of the public are disenfranchised because their representatives supported Constitutional, legal remedies against potential election fraud was echoed by Ryan Cooper, a chemist who writes about politics for The Week magazine.

The Week is owned by Dennis Publishing which in turn is owned by a London-based private equity firm.

Cooper wrote in his December 12th article:

…it’s worth thinking about what a party seriously committed to preserving democracy would do when faced with a seditious opposition party — namely, cut them out of power and force them to behave. Democrats could declare all traitors ineligible to serve in national office, convene a Patriot Congress composed solely of people who have not committed insurrection against the American government, and use that power to re-entrench democracy.

Cooper italicized the word “force” in his article, demanding political suppression of a party he suggests is guilty of “insurrection” for taking election results to court. In Cooper’s America, Democratic Party victories may not be challenged, legally or otherwise.

In case it was unclear what kind of violent force he was discussing, Cooper states in conclusion: “…this country was founded by people who thought it was worth putting their lives at hazard to throw off tyrannical rule. Perhaps some of that spirit can once again be found.”

When conservatives harken back to the nation’s founding, the media and left calls them extremists. There has thus far been no deplatforming of Cooper for his demands for violent coercion of Trump voters.


Staff Writer

The National Pulse is a part of the American Principles Project.