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New York Times Pushes Chinese Communist Party Propaganda Over Hong Kong

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The New York Times is peddling Chinese Communist Party propaganda again, this time running an op-ed entitled “Hong Kong Is China, Like It Or Not” extolling the Chinese government’s crackdown on the territory and declaring “Hong Kong is part of China and its destiny is intertwined with the mainland’s.”

The nearly 2,000-word op-ed was penned by Regina Ip, a Chinese Communist Party official who served as Hong Kong’s Director of Immigration and Secretary for Security before attaining her current position on Hong Kong’s paramount advisory bodies: the Executive Council and Legislative Council.

Ip, who also ran for Hong Kong Chief Executive, championed the controversial Article 23 of Hong Kong’s constitution which requires the enactment of national security laws to prohibit “treason, secession, sedition [and] subversion” against the Chinese Communist Party.

Despite this, The New York Times saw no issue in running an op-ed of Ip’s, echoing the brutal Chinese Communist Party’s official line on the subject of Hong Kong’s sovereignty.

In contrast, when The New York Times ran an op-ed by Senator Tom Cotton regarding riots in response to the death of George Floyd, they were met with harsh criticism from mainstream media counterparts, ultimately prompting an apology from the outlet.

Sen. Cotton was quick to point out that The New York Times “will run explicit Chinese Communist propaganda, but they can’t run op-eds from Republican senators.”

And The New York Times is at it again.

The Chinese Communist Party-penned piece brazenly begins by declaring “Hong Kong is part of China and that its destiny is intertwined with the mainland’s”:

“No amount of outcry, condemnation or sanctions over the Chinese government’s purported encroachment in Hong Kong’s affairs will alter the fact that Hong Kong is part of China and that its destiny is intertwined with the mainland’s.”

Ip continued, “thanking” the Chinese Communist Party’s controversial Hong Kong National Security Law:

“Something had to be done, and the Chinese authorities did it. The scale and frequency of antigovernment protests has now subsided — thanks to a national security law for Hong Kong promulgated in Beijing on June 30.”

Ip also excuses the Chinese Communist Party’s rationale for cracking down on Hong Kong, insisting “from Beijing’s point of view, democratic development in Hong Kong has brought about nothing but chaos, polarization and anti-China sentiment”:

I see little chance of any compromise being reached between the authorities in Beijing and the democratic camp in Hong Kong, be it about the right to elect directly the chief executive or any other major matter. From Beijing’s point of view, democratic development in Hong Kong has brought about nothing but chaos, polarization and anti-China sentiment.

What’s more, the piece emphasizes Hong Kong ought to be grateful for its relationship with China, specifically its “bilateral agreements with foreign countries and its membership in numerous international organizations”:

“A realistic goal for Hong Kong ought to be remaining the freest and most international city in China and retaining its unique international status, thanks to the city’s many bilateral agreements with foreign countries and its membership in numerous international organizations.”

But the New York Times has collaborated with the Chinese Communist Party before.

For example, the outlet is identified as providing “talent, equipment, and internships” as part of a “long history of cooperation” with Tsinghua University’s journalism school.

The China-based school’s explicit purpose is to accomplish the “tasks for news media” outlined by the Central Committee of the Chinese government.

In order to “cultivate talented professionals” who can “achieve these goals,” the Dean of the school wants to apply what he calls the “correct political orientation” – Marxism – to journalism:

“We should be committed to a firm and correct political orientation. Our School has been actively exploring the theory and practices of Marxist Journalism, namely, to applying the Marxist theory in observing the world, selecting and handling news production.”

Central to the Beijing-based school’s mission is training journalists who “take a lead in public opinion” as opposed to placing emphasis on factual, objective reporting, reflective of the Chinese Communist Party’s weaponization of media as a tool to reinforce party narratives. Hence the country’s nonexistent freedom of the press and routine suppression of journalists.

What’s more, the outlet also uncritically published highlights from Adolf Hitler’s playbook Mein Kampf on the eve of the Nazi’s largest military push: the invasion of the Soviet Union, also known as Operation Barbarossa.

The piece, “The Art of Propaganda,” earned a full-page display in the New York Times Magazine on June 22, 1941.


Natalie Winters

Natalie Winters is an Investigative Reporter at the National Pulse and contributor to The National Pulse podcast.