3 Reasons Why Making Texting and Driving a Primary Offense Is a Bad Idea

In the last session of the Iowa State Legislature, Senate File 234 was signed into law, moving texting and driving from a secondary offense to a primary offense. While no doubt well-intentioned, this legislation represents just the latest example of the danger of emotionally driven legislation. Of course, Iowa isn’t the only state that has made texting and driving a primary offense: California, Alaska, North Dakota, and several other states have already taken the same step. Most other states have it listed as some sort of secondary offense. It’s easy to see why this sort of legislation is put into

Six Days Left: Trump Has a Lot of Outs

When poker players are drawing to a straight or a flush, they will often talk about having a certain number of “outs” — i.e. how many cards are left in the deck that can make their hand, allowing them to win the pot. Donald Trump doesn’t have a winning hand yet, but he has a lot of outs. Last Thursday night, we wrote at Townhall about Donald Trump’s easier-than-you-think path to 270 electoral votes. We explained that Trump could get to 265 by winning Utah, Georgia, Iowa, Ohio, Arizona, Florida, Nevada, and North Carolina. At the time, this still seemed like a

Trump’s Path to 270 Is Easier Than You Think

“It’s over. Trump can’t win.” That’s the narrative the Clinton campaign and the mainstream media have relentlessly promoted over the past several days. The problem with that narrative is that it is a bald-faced lie. This election is nowhere near over. Not even close! Let’s take a look at the electoral map. Remember, to become the next president of the United States, Trump needs to win 270 electoral votes. Conversely, he needs to hold Hillary Clinton to 269 electoral votes because, with a Republican House of Representatives, a 269-269 tie is likely to also result in a Trump presidency. Trump’s baseline

The Five Battleground States Trump Needs to Win

The media has grown obsessed with driving the narrative that Hillary Clinton has this election in the bag. Supposedly, according to our elite overlords, this election is so over. You might as well stay home! But when you analyze the data, placed in context, especially on a state-by-state basis, this narrative reveals itself to be ridiculous. The presidential race is still very close. It’s not over yet. Some pollsters say Clinton is up double digits. Others say the race is a virtual tie. The stark differences can be chalked up to differing turnout models: Will Democrats turn out for Hillary Clinton

Will Churches in Massachusetts Be Forced to Comply with Transgenderism?

Two months ago, a major controversy erupted in Iowa over religious liberty and “gender identity” when the state’s Civil Rights Commission put forward guidelines threatening churches which did not conform to the new transgender ideology. According to the Commission, all “non-religious activities” occurring at a church are subject to a new interpretation of Iowa’s Civil Rights Act, which includes a mandate that bathrooms and other public facilities be open to individuals based on their “gender identification” as well as a ban on conduct which would make “persons of any particular…gender identity” feel “unwelcome.” While the Commission later slightly revised the

New State Polls Confirm Trump’s Upward Trend

On Friday, we broke down the Electoral College and proposed several different scenarios where Trump could win the presidency. He needs to perform well in 12 key battleground states. Iowa and Virginia are two of those states. And according to a new pair of Emerson polls, Trump is winning in Iowa and virtually tied in Virginia. Emerson (Iowa, 8/31 – 9/1): Trump 44, Clinton 39, Johnson 8 (Trump +5) Emerson (Virginia, 8/31 – 9/1): Clinton 44, Trump 43, Johnson 11 (Clinton +1) That being said, we should probably curb our enthusiasm. Trump still has a lot of work to do in Pennsylvania

Bush: “Not going to back down” on Common Core

Real Clear Politics and the Associated Press reported on former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush’s most recent string of events and appearances in Iowa this past weekend. One notable appearance was a March 6th fundraiser for Rep. David Young near Des Moines, where a supporter in attendance reportedly told Bush, “I applaud you for your support of Common Core, keep on that topic.” Bush responded by saying: “Raising expectations and having accurate assessments of where kids are is essential for success, and I’m not going to back down on that.” RCP reports that he added: “What I can tell you is the

Huckabee’s Pitch Stays Trained to Social Issues

In a WSJ story on Mike Huckabee’s refusal to run from the social issues, the very influential Iowan Bob Vander Plaats notes the role Huckabee is already playing: “Mike Huckabee is going to force the others to speak about value issues: life, marriage and religious liberty.” Maggie Gallagher is the editor of ThePulse2016.com.