Ohio Enacts Pro-Life Heartbeat Law Protecting Babies from Abortion

The seventh-largest state in the U.S. has enacted a law to protect unborn babies from abortion as soon as a heartbeat can be detected. Ohio Governor Mike DeWine signed the Human Rights Protection Act on Thursday after it passed the state House by a margin of 56-40 and the state Senate by a margin of 18-13. (Similar bills had passed the state legislature in 2016 and 2018 but were vetoed by then Gov. John Kasich.) The law prohibits abortionists from aborting any baby once a fetal heartbeat can be detected — usually around six to eight weeks into the pregnancy

Supreme Court Blocks Louisiana Abortion Law

In a blow to the pro-life movement, the U.S. Supreme Court has blocked Louisiana’s Unsafe Abortion Protection Act. The law was blocked 5-4 on Thursday after Chief Justice John Roberts, in a move that surprised many, joined the liberal wing of the court to form the majority opinion. While the decision currently blocks the law, the battle is not over — the case has been given a temporary stay and is likely to be challenged during the court’s next term in October. Enacted in 2014, the law required doctors who perform abortions in Louisiana to have admitting privileges at a

A Year for Life: The Top 5 Pro-Life Victories of 2018

2018 was certainly a year of victory for the pro-life movement. As the year draws to a close and we look back on what took place, pro-lifers across the country have cause for celebration. Here are 2018’s top five pro-life victories: 1.) Pro-abortion senators lose their seats in the midterms. A markedly positive outcome from the roller coaster of the 2018 midterms was the number of pro-abortion U.S. senators that lost their races. Politicians such as Senators Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) and Bill Nelson (D-Fla.) will not be returning to Congress in January, which is good news for the unborn. 2.)

This Week in Economics: 4 Stories You Should Know About

1.) Trump’s FCC Shoots Down California’s “Texting Tax” Proposal. This week, overzealous California regulators saw their hopes of enacting a “Texting Tax” squashed by President Trump’s FCC. The FCC issued a declaratory ruling which found that “text messaging” is an information service, thereby limiting the state’s authority to regulate. Prior to the FCC’s announcement, California regulators were set to vote on an initiative that would have imposed a tax on consumers’ phone bills in order to fund additional government services. California residents should be grateful the FCC saved them from their bloated state governments’ latest tax-and-spend scheme. 2.) Republicans to

Will This Pro-Life Indiana Law Provoke a Supreme Court Showdown?

The state of Indiana passed a crucial pro-life law in 2016, banning abortions based on the genetic abnormalities of the unborn child. Now, the state is asking the Supreme Court to uphold the law. Signed by Vice President Mike Pence when he was still the governor of Indiana, House Enrolled Act 1337 is comprehensive pro-life legislation. Among other things, the law “prohibits a person from performing an abortion if the person knows that the pregnant woman is seeking the abortion solely because of: (1) the race, color, national origin, ancestry, or sex of the fetus; or (2) a diagnosis or

Justice Kavanaugh Faces First Test of Abortion Stance on Supreme Court

Although many have speculated how our nation’s newest Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh would rule when it comes to abortion, the first test of his stance has begun. The justices met in conference last Friday, October 12th, to discuss which upcoming cases they will hear. Two of the cases on the table concerned abortion providers: Andersen v. Planned Parenthood of Kansas and Mid-Missouri and Gee v. Planned Parenthood of Gulf Coast. The cases are practically identical in detail. They set one question before the court: Under the Medicaid Act, are individuals allowed to sue their states in federal court in

Could Democrats’ Antics on Kavanaugh Save the GOP Congress?

The Kavanaugh confirmation fight may be over. But the larger battle is still raging. For months, polls have showed an “intensity gap” between Republicans and Democrats for the 2018 midterm elections. Democrats have been much more excited to vote in the elections, and enthusiasm is critical for turnout. But polls taken in the aftermath of sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and the ensuing media firestorm have shown the Democrats’ intensity gap has evaporated. Why? Prior to the fight, some Republicans didn’t feel motivated to get out and vote in 2018. For those who don’t follow politics

Are Democrats’ Attacks on Kavanaugh Backfiring?

This article was originally posted at The Hill. Thursday’s appearance by Judge Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate Judiciary Committee was a watershed moment for contemporary American politics. But while many stories will, understandably, focus on the continuing escalation of political polarization and tribalism which the nationally televised hearing made painfully visible, there is another, perhaps even more important takeaway to consider. For Republicans, Sept. 27, 2018, should be remembered as the day when their party became, clearly and unapologetically, the Party of Donald Trump. Until then, the battle for control of the GOP — which began during the presidential primaries of

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