The National Pulse

Transgender Surgeries Now Deemed ‘Non-Essential’. They Should Be, Forever.

The novel coronavirus has forced doctors across the country to halt elective procedures, including many transgender reassignment surgeries. However, some studies suggest these surgeries may not ever be essential.

In the 1960s, John’s Hopkins University pioneered the sex-reassignment surgery. Outpatient studies conducted in the 1970s found that, while most of the post-surgery patients described themselves as “satisfied” by the results, the treated patients showed no psycho-social improvements.

Dr. Paul McHugh, psychiatrist-in-chief at John’s Hopkins Hospital at the time, eventually discontinued the procedures citing the unfavorable outpatient data.

Claiming that this is civil-rights matter and encouraging surgical intervention is in reality to collaborate with and promote a mental disorder.

Dr. McHugh, Wall St. Journal, 2014

To Dr. McHugh, producing a satisfied yet still distressed patient did not justify surgically amputating healthy, functioning organs.

Though genital reconstruction and hormone therapies offer a means of partial transition from one gender to another, a true elective sex-change remains biologically impossible (barring extremely abnormal genetic mutations).

According to Dr. McHugh, “People who undergo sex-reassignment surgery do not change from men to women or vice versa. Rather, they become feminized men or masculinized women.”

Innate neurological barriers to sex-reassignment surgery ensure its inevitable incompletion.

Neurologists find the female brain and male brain maintain distinct characteristics throughout life. For instance, male brains utilize seven times more grey matter, areas of the brain that localize information and action. Female brains, on the other hand, produce nearly ten times more white matter, which connects the brain’s processing centers.

These biological differences manifest in evolutionary distinctions between the two sexes. For example, females tend to be great multi-taskers while men thrive in single, task-focused environments.

Even in the womb, the brain of a male fetus differs greatly from that of a female.

Dr. Gregory L. Jantz points out that during prenatal development, “females tend to have verbal centers on both sides of the brain, while males tend to have verbal centers on only the left hemisphere.”

Dr. Ruben Gur, neurologist at the University of Pennsylvania, believes this difference relates to females’ ability to express emotion and feeling more effectively than their male counterparts.

According to Dr. Gur, “Most of these differences are complementary. They increase the chances of males and females joining together. It helps the whole species.”

In addition to the neurological differences between men women, the karyotype displaying a person’s sex chromosomes – XX for females and XY for males – cannot surgically be altered.

In short, these biological variances make a full sex change unattainable.

Nonetheless, the progressive left demands citizens discount basic biological definitions of sex in order to protect an individual’s subjective sense of their true self – often to the detriment of those they seek to help.

Graduate studies at the University of California Los Angeles document a 40 percent suicide rate among transgendered individuals, shockingly higher than the national average.

Dr. McHugh believes that “the high suicide rate certainly challenges the surgery prescription.”

Perhaps the novel coronavirus’ suspension of transgender reassignment surgeries will provide the medical community an opportunity to consider the downsides of these procedures.

Kingsley Cortes

Kingsley Cortes is a 2020 Writing Fellow for the National Pulse