“Mobs vs. Jobs”: Why Trump’s New Slogan Perfectly Sums Up 2018

President Trump reminded us that he is surpassed by none when it comes branding when he recently unveiled his new slogan for the midterms, “Democrats produce mobs, Republicans produce jobs.” Is there a more succinct summary of the political divide since Trump’s election than this? Let’s recap: At least a handful of Trump administration officials have endured public harassment by left-wing activists since inauguration. Senators Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) and Ted Cruz (R-Texas) were both accosted at restaurants while dining with their spouses. In the midst of the Brett Kavanaugh drama, deranged lunatic Ronald Derisi made threatening phone calls to two GOP

Could Democrats’ Antics on Kavanaugh Save the GOP Congress?

The Kavanaugh confirmation fight may be over. But the larger battle is still raging. For months, polls have showed an “intensity gap” between Republicans and Democrats for the 2018 midterm elections. Democrats have been much more excited to vote in the elections, and enthusiasm is critical for turnout. But polls taken in the aftermath of sexual assault allegations against Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh and the ensuing media firestorm have shown the Democrats’ intensity gap has evaporated. Why? Prior to the fight, some Republicans didn’t feel motivated to get out and vote in 2018. For those who don’t follow politics

Are Democrats’ Attacks on Kavanaugh Backfiring?

This article was originally posted at The Hill. Thursday’s appearance by Judge Brett Kavanaugh before the Senate Judiciary Committee was a watershed moment for contemporary American politics. But while many stories will, understandably, focus on the continuing escalation of political polarization and tribalism which the nationally televised hearing made painfully visible, there is another, perhaps even more important takeaway to consider. For Republicans, Sept. 27, 2018, should be remembered as the day when their party became, clearly and unapologetically, the Party of Donald Trump. Until then, the battle for control of the GOP — which began during the presidential primaries of

Senate GOP Takes Right Approach to Kavanaugh Allegations

When news first broke that Professor Christine Blasey Ford had accused Judge Brett Kavanaugh of committing attempted sexual assault against her when they were both teenagers — just days before his Senate confirmation vote to become the Supreme Court’s newest justice — many on the Left immediately called for Kavanaugh’s head. ABC News Chief Political Analyst Matthew Dowd had this to say, all but condemning Kavanaugh as guilty: Enough with the “he said, she said” storyline. If this is he said, she said, then let’s believe the she in these scenarios. She has nothing to gain, and everything to lose.

Pro-Common Core Republicans Suffer Big Losses in 2018 Primaries

Although many factors are involved, an encouraging trend for parents and grassroots activists is emerging in this 2018 Republican gubernatorial primary season. Those candidates listening to parents by opposing Common Core and federal intrusion into education have defeated or are leading establishment, pro-Common Core candidates nearly across the board. Here are three of the most prominent examples: Georgia In Georgia, Conservative Secretary of State Brian Kemp and moderate Lieutenant Governor Casey Cagle emerged from a crowded and bruising seven-person primary with Cagle ahead by 13 percentage points. Cagle was far better funded than Kemp and had much establishment backing, including

Republicans Unveil Conservative Proposal for Paid Family Leave

Last week, two congressional Republicans introduced a concrete plan for a concept that is gaining ground in the GOP: paid family leave. Sen. Marco Rubio of Florida and Rep. Ann Wagner of Missouri unveiled the Economic Security for New Parents Act, one of the first pieces of Republican-backed family leave legislation. The bill would allow new parents to withdraw Social Security funds after the birth of a child to cover at least two months of paid parental leave. In exchange, their eligibility date for Social Security retirement funds would be delayed by the amount of time taken in leave. In

Who Will Replace Paul Ryan as Speaker? These Are the Contenders.

House Republicans have been in various stages of chaos — both healthy and unhealthy — ever since retaking control of the chamber in 2010. Speaker John Boehner was constantly trying to cut deals with President Obama, usually giving the President most or all of what he wanted, so Republicans wanted him gone. Boehner resigned in 2015 and is now a high-paid lobbyist, while his lieutenant, former Majority Leader Eric Cantor, was taken out in a shocking primary defeat. Their clearest successor at the time was Majority Whip Kevin McCarthy, but he stumbled quickly and took himself out of the running.

Who Will Win the Senate in November? A Glance at Each Battleground Race

With just over 100 days to go before election day, what’s the state of the battleground Senate races? The party which controls the White House usually loses seats in Congress in the first midterm after the presidential election. This year is unique in that Republicans could be poised to lose seats in the House while gaining seats in the Senate due to a highly favorable electoral map. There are 10 Senate Democrats up for re-election in states President Trump carried in 2016. Republicans are hoping to hold all their seats in the Senate and pick off a few Democrats for

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